ANH2020 Learning Lab Resources

Learning Labs at ANH2020 covered a wide range of tools, methods and topics relevant to agriculture, nutrition and health research and practice, designed and facilitated by experts from around the world. See below for recordings of and resources for each of the Learning Labs.

Twitter handles for all speakers can be found in the ANH2020 social media toolkit here.


Animal Welfare in Agriculture, Nutrition and Health

Live session: 23 June, 12:30-14:30 BST​

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

  • Anna Marry, Global Communications Manager, The Brooke Hospital for Animals  

  • Delia Grace, Co-Lead, Human and Animal Health, International Livestock Research Institute 
  • Rebecca Doyle, Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne 
  • Robyn Alders, Professor, Australian National University; Senior Fellow, Chatham House 
  • Klara Saville, Head of Global Animal Health, Welfare and Community Development, The Brooke Hospital for Animals 
  • Kate Fletcher, Senior Manager, Global Animal Welfare, The Brooke Hospital for Animals 
  • James Kithuka, Animal Welfare Officer, Brooke East Africa
  • Vincent Oloo, Animal Welfare Capacity Building Officer, Brooke East Africa
  • Samantha Opere, Veterinary Surgeon/ Head of Region, KENDAT (Kenya Network for Dissemination of Agricultural Technologies)

Description and Learning Objectives:​ Considering livestock agriculture is of paramount importance to agriculture, nutrition and health (ANH) research and its application. Livestock directly contribute to agriculture and nutrition through animal source foods production and have a huge impact on human health (e.g. through food safety) as well as indirectly e.g. through generating income and/ or empowering women. This is true for both production animals such as dairy cows or poultry and working animals such as horses or donkeys that provide water for agriculture and transport agricultural produce.  

Animal welfare impacts animal health and productivity, being a critical, yet largely overlooked, aspect of livestock agriculture. This session will explore key concepts and issues in animal welfare in relation to ANH research and practice.  

Learning objectives:  

  • Build understanding of animal welfare and its importance for research ethics  
  • Introduce the concept of One Welfare and its application  
  • Introduce tools and metrics used to measure animal welfare  
  • Highlight the importance of animal welfare to getting published in high impact journals 

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:


INDDEX24 Dietary Assessment Platform: New technology for dietary assessment in low- and middle-income countries 

Live session: 23 June, 12:30-14:30 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

Description and Learning Objectives:​ This learning lab will provide participants with an introduction to INDDEX24, an innovative tool designed to facilitate the collection and use of dietary data in low- and middle-income countries. The learning lab will be most appropriate for participants with some prior exposure to dietary assessment. The learning lab is an opportunity to discuss the challenges related to dietary assessment, learn about the key features of INDDEX24,  and to learn how INDDEX24 may alleviate some of those challenges.

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:

  • INDDEX24 Brief
  • Overcoming Dietary Assessment Challenges in Low-Income Countries
  • INDDEX24 Learning Lab Participant Survey: If you received a message that you have been allocated to participate in the  INDDEX24 learning lab, please fill out this brief survey prior to the learning lab. The estimated completion time is 2 minutes. The survey asks questions about your experience in the area of dietary assessment. This survey is not for research purposes. Results of the survey will be accessed and used only by the learning lab organizers for the purposes of understanding the backgrounds and level of dietary assessment experience of prospective learning lab participants. Responses are anonymous and confidential, and results will only be presented in an aggregate fashion, not traceable to any individual. We would appreciate it if you could complete the survey, but you are not required to complete it in order to participate in the learning lab. Link to survey: https://tufts.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_aVlKBAx0HFuRurb
  • Introduction to the INDDEX Project and INDDEX24 (video)

Affordability of Nutritious Diets 

Live session: 23 June, 15:00-17:00 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

Description and Learning Objectives:​ This learning lab will equip participants with skills to use food prices for understanding the cost of nutritious diets. In this session we discuss sources of food price data, and use data from countries in Africa and South Asia to measure trends over time, seasonal fluctuations and spatial differences. We will use prices of diverse foods to compute price indices including the cost of nutrient adequacy and the cost of recommended diets.

Resources from the session:

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:


Understanding drivers of food choice in changing food environments of low- and middle-income countries to inform program and policy 

Live session: 24 June, 12:30-14:30 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

Description and Learning Objectives:​ Food choice is a process of decision making that informs the selection, acquisition, and consumption of foods from options available in the food environment. Rapid changes in food environments are fostering changes in food choice that have important implications for health and well-being. Understanding how people make food choices in the context of changing food environments is important for program and policy development. Four case studies will be used to frame a discussion about drivers of food choice in low- and middle-income countries and implications for policy and program action will be identified for each case.  

Participants will be able to: 

  • Describe the process of food choice and implications for health and well-being. 
  • Describe relationships between changing food environments and food choice that have implications for health and well-being 
  • Identify and describe policy and program actions to promote positive changes in food environments for healthy food choice  

Resources from the session:


Using Nutrition Modeling Tools to Inform Policy Decisions 

Live session: 24 June, 15:00-17:00 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

  • Gilles Bergeron, New York Academy of Sciences
  • Steve Vosti, University of California Davis 
  • Edward Joy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 
  • Elaine Ferguson, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 
  • Frances Knight, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Description and Learning Objectives:​ This session will introduce participants to the Nutrition Modeling Consortium, and to some of the tools that consortium members have developed and used to help select, design and manage evidence-based nutrition policies and nutrition intervention programs. Participants will be split into teams, each receiving a policy- or programme-relevant question, e.g., “Should vitamin A supplementation programmes be scaled-back in Nepal?”, or, “to what extent might food fortification cost-effectively address iron-deficiency anemia among women of reproductive age?” The teams will be asked to design a strategy for answering their policy- and programmatic relevant question, using one or a combination of the modelling tools available, with some time spent addressing underlying data needs and the pathways through which new model-based information would flow to reach decision-makers. Teams will present their findings back to the wider group followed by a plenary discussion.  

After completing the Learning Lab, participants will be better informed on how to frame their nutrition policy issues, how select the appropriate tool for given types of nutrition policy or programmatic questions / decisions, how to access and use the tools, the tools’ strengths and limitations, and the data inputs and skills required to use them. 

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:


Assessing food environments for healthy diets 

Live session: 24 June, 15:00-17:00 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

Description and Learning Objectives:​ The food environment represents the range of foods that can be accessed in the context where people live and includes both natural and build environments. Food choices result from an interaction of the food environment and individual-level factors such as familiarity with foods, taste preferences, convenience (time scarcity, food prices), perceived food safety and health-related motives. Food environments are considered healthy when they “enable consumers to make nutritious food choices with the potential to improve diets and reduce the burden of malnutrition.” Shaping food environments to enable healthy food choices, can impact positively on diet quality and nutrition. This session will provide an overview of innovative tools to assess a food environment and allow participants to experiment with some of the tools within a case study. 

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:


Quantifying postharvest food losses, their economic and nutritional impact, and interventions to reduce them 

Live session: 25 June​, 12:30-14:30 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

  • Tanya Stathers, Natural Resources Institute (NRI), University of Greenwich
  • Brighton Mvumi, University of Zimbabwe 
  • Bruno Tran, Natural Resources Institute (NRI), University of Greenwich
  • Julia de Bruyn, Natural Resources Institute (NRI), University of Greenwich
  • Aditya Parmar, Natural Resources Institute (NRI), University of Greenwich

Description and Learning Objectives:​ Food loss and waste reduction strengthens food and nutrition security and lowers the environmental impacts of agriculture. Significant quantities of crops grown for food are lost during and after harvest. To effectively reduce these postharvest losses (PHLs), and meet SDG/Malabo targets, we need to understand why, where, and at what scale they are occurring. This session will explore the causes of PHLs, guide participants to use the African Postharvest Losses Information System to quantify and understand the economic and nutritional impact of these losses, reflect on policy and programmatic applications, and share evidence from a recent systematic review of interventions to reduce PHLs. 

Following the session participants will be able to:  

  • Understand why postharvest loss reduction is important 
  • Describe three causes of postharvest food losses 
  • Use the African Postharvest Losses Information System (APHLIS www.aphlis.net) to quantify postharvest losses for a range of crops and locations using the following metrics: percentage weight loss, tonnes, nutrients, USD, annual dietary requirements of how many people (including by gender and age group)
  • Explore the forthcoming Ceres2030 evidence synthesis and gap map of interventions that smallholder farmers and their associated value chain actors can use to reduce postharvest losses in 22 food crops.  

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:

  • Please start by completing a few pre-session poll questions. Go to https://www.menti.com/tagmxy48do

  • Then please watch this introductory video on postharvest aspects of food systems and causes of postharvest losses (please open the video in Google Chrome, Firefox or Safari – as it seems to struggle in Edge)

  • Then spend a little time exploring the African Postharvest Losses Information System (APHLIS) www.aphlis.net. We demonstrate some of the features of APHLIS at the end of the introductory video, and there is an online tutorial here (note it has sub-titles and no audio)

Optional further reading and watching:


Enabling the enablers of positive behaviors: the Education for Effective Nutrition in Action (ENACT) approach

Live session: 25 June​, 12:30-14:30 BST​

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

  • Cynthia Matare, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
  • Nadia Fanou, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
  • Joelle Zeitouny, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
  • Julius Ntwenya, University of Dodoma
  • Anthony Jennings, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
  • Ramani Wijesinha-Bettoni, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Description and Learning Objectives:​ Nutrition education is an essential component of social and behavior change (SBC) programmes, but nutrition educators responsible for design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of SBC programmes rarely receive adequate training in nutrition education. This session introduces participants to the ENACT course, which emphasizes a hands-on approach for training in nutrition education. Similar to how the ENACT course is delivered, participants will reflect on real-world problems and case studies, discuss what works and why, and practice what they have learned. The ENACT course consists of ten units that cover the basic principles and practice of nutrition education, and includes activities designed to explore aspects of real life, discover principles in action and apply what is learned. Participants of this session will have a chance to experience being an ENACT student through interactive tutorials, group discussions and a mini-group project. 

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session:


Strengthening Economic Evaluation of Multisectoral approaches for Nutrition (SEEMS-Nutrition)

Live session: 25 June, 15:00-17:00 BST

Recording:

Facilitator(s):  

  • Carol Levin, University of Washington 
  • Chloe Puett, PhD, Stony Brook University 
  • Christopher Kemp, PhD University of Washington 

Description and Learning Objectives:​ This learning lab builds on AHN Academy technical brief on Economic Evaluation of Multisectoral Actions for Health and Nutrition. Participants will become familiar with how to apply a new framework for assessing the costs and benefits of agriculture, health and nutrition interventions/programs and learn about the types of economic evidence generated from such analyses. The specific learning objectives will be to: (1) Learn about the ANH Academy framework for economic evaluation of multisectoral actions and its subsequent application as part of the SEEMS-Nutrition Project; (2) Become familiar with a set of planning tools and cost data collection tools for conducting their own cost study; (3) Understand how to integrate cost data collection in on-going impact evaluations; (4) Learn how these combined data can yield cost-efficiency information, cost-effectiveness and benefit cost analysis 

Preparatory materials to be reviewed in advance of live session: